Pollinators on the TC3 Farm

Pollinators on the TC3 Farm – Student Post by Kateri

Bees at Dyce Laboratory
Honey bees in a managed hive buzz as the Sustainable Farming and Food Systems students observe them during a field trip to Dyce Laboratory

Hi all! It is the time of year on the TC3 Farm when flowers are appearing all around us! Tomato plants are flowering and fruiting, wildflowers are filling up the wild areas around our worked fields with color, and the squash plants need their white row covers to be pulled so that pollinating insects can visit their beautiful yellow flowers. All of these things make this a good time to share with our readers about these important friends of ours, the pollinators.

No doubt you have been hearing about bees in the news lately-and with good reason! The populations of these superior pollinators are on the decline-even in Upstate New York. But what do pollinators do for farms? Farmers rely on pollinators like bees to fertilize their flowering crops. Fertilization, occurs by way of the transfer of pollen (male gametes)-found in the plant’s flower and produced by the male part of the plant found there- to the ovule, the female part of the plant also found in the flower. This process must take place in order for the farmer to obtain the fruits of his labor (pun intended!). It is important to clarify that bees are not nature’s only pollinators. Butterflies, moths, and other insects also enable the fertilization of crops by spreading pollen, though not as much as bees. The incredibly designed hairs that cover the bodies of bees and easily pick up pollen as they buzz in flowers, make bees pollinators of extreme importance, and not just to farmers, but to anyone who eats most edible plants!

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Transplanting Greenhouse Tomatoes – Student Post

Tomato Time – Student Post By Cody – Week of July 26th, 2017

Greenhouse Tomatoes for Transplanting
A Flat of Tomatoes Ready for Transplanting

Hey all! It is that time a year again to get excited about all the delicious varieties of tomatoes being sown at the TC3 Farm. With over two dozen heirloom, cherry and hybrid tomato varieties on the Farm, it is a mighty challenge to tame those taste buds as all the young seedlings are transplanted.  The TC3 Farm grows both field and greenhouse/ hoop house tomatoes.  Crop rotation best practices are followed in determining where the tomatoes will be grown both in the field and indoors.  This week the farm team transplanted a variety of tomatoes in the greenhouse and hoop house.  In this post, I will describe the techniques in preparing and setting up a greenhouse for tomato cultivation and some tips for having a successful and healthy growing season.

At this point you may be wondering why the TC3 Farm grows so many different varieties of tomatoes.  I believe the unequivocal answer is that crop diversity is a key attribute to a successful and healthy farm operation.  One might also be asking if there is an advantage to growing tomatoes in a greenhouse.  I believe there are many advantages for the use of a greenhouse, especially in a relatively short northeast growing season.  The first advantage is that a greenhouse can extend the growing season, and this is especially important for tomatoes which are a high value crop. Secondly, a greenhouse provides for temperature, precipitation and air flow control.  This is crucial for tomatoes as it reduces the chances for fungal and oomycete diseases such as early blight and late blight which can devastate plants in the nightshade family.  Proper crop rotation planning can reduce blight and pest problems during the growing season. 

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Harvesting Wild Plants at the TC3 Farm

TC3 Farm Update and Harvesting Wild Plants at the TC3 Farm – Student Post by Jacob – Week of June 12th, 2017

Tomato and Pepper Transplants
Tomato and Pepper Transplants on the TC3 Farm

Howdy folks. My name is Jacob and I am giving you all a quick update on what has recently been happening on the TC3 Farm. We have been hustling to get a lot of transplanting done and over the past week we got a lot of our nightshades planted including, field peppers, field tomatoes, and field eggplants.

We also had the owners of Thalli Foods, a food business based on harvesting wild plants as well as invasive species visit us during lecture. The owners: Edward and Avery, gave us a tour of their farm website which has a ton of different plants that are available to harvest in this region for all seasons. They are foragers and have many years of experience harvesting wild edible plants in Kent, England, Their mission is to bring the ancient knowledge of harvesting wild edibles to the public and to encourage biodiversity and nutritional diversity. As the human population continues to grow, our need for food will increase. Being able to harvest or potentially incorporate these wild plants into our diets will vastly increase humanity’s food supply. These wild foods are very flavorful and add a unique option to any chef’s menu.

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Vegetable Production on the Farm – Student Post

Garlic Greens Harvest
Garlic Greens Harvest

Vegetable Production on the TC3 Farm – Student Post by Jasmine – Week of June 5th, 2017

Summertime is almost officially here and vegetable production is in full swing at the Tompkins Cortland Farm. The CSA has begun, restaurant orders form Coltivare are being placed, and the Farm Stand on campus has been going well. During the week of June 5th-9th, the students were engaged in a variety of different tasks including planting transplants like lettuce, beets, sorrel, dandelion, and a variety of peppers and tomatoes out in the field. We also weeded in the strawberry patch, and harvested spring crops such as Hakurei turnips, strawberries, and garlic greens, Garlic greens are simply young garlic harvested before the bulb has a chance to develop. They can be sautéed just like traditional garlic and are a nice addition to salads or soups.

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Wild Foods Forage and Feast at Tompkins Cortland

Farm to Bistro Wild Foods Forage and Feast – Tompkins Cortland Community College

When: Saturday May 6th, 2017 – 10:30-2:30

Where: Starting at the TC3 Farm – 100 Cortland Rd, Dryden, NY

Ending at Coltivare Restaurant – 235 S. Cayuga St, Ithaca, NY

Cost: Public $35/Students $25. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.

Spaces are limited so RSVP to haydenstebbins@gmail.com to reserve your spot.

Forage and Feast

 

 

 

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Culinary Students Improving the Food System Talk

“What’s Left on the Cutting Board: Culinary Students as a Lever for Improving the Food System”

Monday April 24th at 10:30  – Sprole Conference Room at Tompkins Cortland Community College in Dryden.

Coltivare KitchenSustainability issues are at the fore in our industry but too often it is up to accomplished chefs to have an informed opinion on these matters. Learn what is being done to inculcate sustainability and health-promotion practices among our student body and sample some hands-on solutions that are hitting the market, balancing taste, nutrition and improving the food system.

Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D., is Professor of Culinary Arts and Food Science at Drexel University. Before moving to Drexel, Deutsch built the culinary arts program at Kingsborough Community College, City University of New York (CUNY) and the Ph.D. concentration in food studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. At Drexel, he oversees the Drexel Food Lab, a student-driven product development and food innovation lab focused on solving real world problems for industry and good food projects. He is the author or editor of six books including Barbecue: A Global History (with Megan Elias), Culinary Improvisation, and Gastropolis: Food and Culture in New York City(with Annie Hauck-Lawson) and numerous articles in journals of food studies, public health and hospitality education. He earned his Ph.D. in Food Studies and Food Management from New York University (2004), his culinary degree from the Culinary Institute of America  (AOS, Culinary Arts, 1997), and is an alumnus of Drexel University (BS, Hospitality Management, 1999). A classically trained chef, Deutsch worked in a variety of settings including product development, small luxury inns and restaurants. When not in the kitchen, he can be found behind his tuba.

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