Agroecological Alternatives to Herbicides

What to do when over-zealous pesticide use exacerbates pest management problems – Agroecological alternatives to herbicides Open Lecture

David MortensenThursday, March 9, 2017 at 12:20pm to 1:10pm

Emerson Hall, 135, Cornell University

Agroecological Alternatives to Herbicides: The prevailing form of agriculture performed today suffers from “lock-in” which is to say the production system has features that limit it’s ability to redirect. One such feature is genetically modified herbicide resistant crops. Widespread adoption of the package of seed and associated traits, matching herbicides and insecticide and fungicide seed treatments has resulted in significant increases in pesticide use.  Mortensen will outline how this lock-in has evolved, the downside effects of lock-in then spend the remainder of the seminar outlining recent agroecological advances that offer a glimpse to a more sustainable path forward.

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Organic Dairy and Field Crop Conference

NOFA New York 2017 Organic Dairy and Field Crop Conference Featuring Keynote Speaker Jack Lazor, founder of Butterworks Farm!

organic dairy and field crop conferenceMarch 16-17 at the Holiday Inn Syracuse (441 Electronics Pkwy, Liverpool, NY 13088)

NOFA NY is excited to announce its 6th Annual Organic Dairy and Field Crop Conference! New this year, they are expanding to a 2-Day event featuring half day intensive workshops on March 17. The conference will be held at the Holiday Inn Liverpool/Syracuse, New York, just off the Thruway and Interstate 81.

They welcome veteran farmers, beginning farmers, and farmers interested in transitioning to organic management. This year we will honor Michael & Gayle Thorpe, NOFA-NY’s Farmers of the Year. Additionally, NOFA-NY Certified Organic, LLC staff will be presenting on Transitioning to Organic Dairy Management and available throughout both the days to answer questions at their trade show booth. Enjoy two days of learning, networking, and information exchange.

REGISTER

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Maple Syrup Production Course Online

Join the Cornell Small Farms Program for this exciting online course in January: 

  INTRO TO MAPLE SYRUP PRODUCTION
(BF 152)

January 17 – February 21, 2017 – with webinars each Tuesday evening from 6:00 – 7:30pm EST.

Maple syrup production is rapidly growing around the Northeast and offers a sound financial opportunity to utilize woodlots sustainably.

This six-week online course explores the range possibilities of maple sugaring on your land – be it for supplemental income or for your livelihood.

Also discussed are “alternative” trees for production, including Birch and Black Walnut. The content presented assumes the student has little past knowledge of sugaring, but a background in agriculture or forestry will be very helpful.

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Week of November 7th – CSA Newsletter

sunrise over hoophouses
A beautiful Sunrise over the Hoophouses.

TC3 Farm’s PSA: Don’t forget to vote!!

Ok folks, we did it! The 22nd and final week of the 2016 TC3 Farm CSA season. What a rollercoaster of a ride. First off, I want to say thank you to all of you. It’s been an honor and absolute pleasure to grow for you your food. I truly hope you enjoyed as much eating it as the TC3 Farm enjoyed growing it. I know the farm can be and will be better, but we’ve come a long way since our first season in 2014. I can probably go on and on about that but I really just want to focus on this season.

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Around the TC3 Farm – Student Post

Around the TC3 Farm Update – A Student Post by Steve

Well howdy there folks, just wanted to give you a little update on some things that are going on around the TC3 Farm lately. The tomatoes in the green house have pretty much run their course and we are now clearing out the plants to get the houses cleaned up and ready for winter plantings. Mostly thanks to our new Meadow Creature broadfork, we greatly increased our tomato yield this year compared to last, and we are still harvesting green tomatoes for the CSA and for the farm stand on campus. We also make sure we take the old plants away from the greenhouse to decay simply because we don’t want them around any other plants in case they have some sort of disease on them, playing it safe.

clearing greenhouse

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Dry Farming, Weeding, and Sticky Traps – Student Post

Dry Farming, Weeding, and Sticky Traps – Student Post By Maria

With the 2016 season well underway, many of the tasks on the TC3 Farm revolve around giving the plants a helping hand, the backbone of being a farmer.  As Todd mentioned in his CSA newsletter this week, our area has been upgraded to a “severe” drought; a big problem here because we mostly practice dry farming. But the plants need water, so I have been lucky enough to have the role affectionately titled Crop Savior. (watering picture) The past few weeks it was an arduous process that involved filling many 5-gallon buckets and trucking them to the field from the barn because the field does not have a water source yet, then using watering cans to get the water to the plants. Water Tank This required a team of people as a couple people filled buckets, while a couple more did the actual watering.  In the aforementioned newsletter, Todd shared the news we were gifted with a very large water tank that fills up the whole of the truck bed. (I was remiss in getting a picture of the tank like I’d hoped)  It has no pump, so it uses gravity to move the water, so our field being on a slope is a good thing in this regard.  While it is a slow flow from the tank out of the hose and it can be a lonely one-person job, the tank lasts for hours before needing a refill!  It’s almost a meditative job, so I rather enjoyed the watering shifts.

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