Planting Kohlrabi, Picking Rocks, Plant Sale, and More

Planting Kohlrabi, Picking Rocks, Plant Sale, and More – TC3 Farm Field Journal for the Week of May 9th, 2016 – Student Post by Hailey

Kohlrabi Flats
Kohlrabi Flats

T​his is the last week of classes before finals! Today we will be transplanting! This is my favorite activity because we get to physically see the changes both in the plants and the landscape. We plant thousands of little baby plants and watch as they grow and we help to nourish them when necessary. We watch them develop into mature plants and then literally get to harvest the fruits of our labor. I don’t think there is a feeling that quite matches that one.

Planting kohlrabi. Today we planted a lot of kohlrabi seedlings. We planted two varieties of kohlrabi, I don’t remember the names of the varieties but one was green and one was purple. We placed the strings that guide the rows we made and we placed the measuring tape to guide us while planting. We planted three rows per bed and two entire beds. In the two outer rows we planted the kohlrabi transplants every six inches at the six and twelve marks. We had to stagger the middle row, planting the seedlings at the three and nine inch marks. Before planting we lay out the little transplants and what is called their root ball, which is just the mass of roots and seed starting soil attached to the little plants. As we lay them out we either plant them right away or we have another person walk behind us and plant them as we lay them.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Strawberry Production on the TC3 Farm

Strawberry Production – This Week on the TC3 Farm – Student Post by Indigo

Strawberry ProductionFor me, nothing brings back Summer memories quite like fresh, sweet strawberries. Strawberries remind me of that sweet spot in the early Summer where nature is buzzing with vibrancy and warm nights go on seemingly endlessly. Before the strawberry eating beings, some work in the field needs to be done!

Last Fall we transplanted the strawberry plants into their beds and covered them to protect against the cold during the Winter months to come. Now as we enter late Spring, we go out to the field to uncover the plants. I’m happy to find that they survived and are well on their way to producing juicy fruits in the near Summer season. Last semester in the Fall, after planting, we trimmed back the extending vines, or runners, that extend from the “mother plant”, and produce new growth which eventually becomes established in the Earth. Some farms, like the one here at TC3, prefer cutting off these runner plants, as they take up more energy to grow. When runners are cut, the mother plant can focus its energy on producing berries, making them bigger and tastier, rather than making baby plants. Our farm is specifically looking to focus on the quality, not quantity of our strawberries.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Potting On Our Tomatoes at the TC3 Farm

This week at the TC3 Farm – Potting On Our Tomatoes – Student Post By Hannah D.

Transplanting TomatoesThis week on the TC3 farm our big project was transplanting, or “potting on” our tomatoes. While the weekly tasks of seeding, weeding and harvesting did not cease this week, potting on our tomatoes was a major project that had all hands on deck. The reason for potting on at this time is because our tomato seedlings were beginning to outgrow their trays. In order to keep them happy and growing at a healthy rate and avoiding getting root bound it was necessary to transplant them to larger cells with more room to grow.

Of course with so many varieties of tomatoes that all look the same at this stage of growth, we had to be vary careful to transplant everything correctly with the proper tags. This is important so that whether we sell these plants to customers or plant them for our own, we are not expecting one thing and getting another. If a customer were to buy a plant expecting one type and got another, not only would that look bad on the farm but they may not be a returning customer.

Read more

Please follow and like us: