Week of June 17th – CSA Newsletter Week #2

Week one of the CSA season is in the books. I hope you all enjoyed your first share of the year. The beginning of the season is always so chaotic with unpredictable weather and a lack of labor at some crucial times. But the students doing their summer internship are doing a great job so … Read more

Week of November 5th – CSA Newsletter

Well, folks, we made it. Another CSA season is in the books and I can’t thank you all enough for taking this roller coaster of a farm season with us and for supporting the TC3 Farm! Many of you have been with us since year one, while others have joined along the way and for some, this is your first season being a CSA member. We’ve come a long way since that first season when it was just myself and a roto-tiller. I had minimal help that first summer, since the degree program didn’t start until that fall. There wasn’t a barn to work out of, a cooler to store veggies in, sinks to wash in or hoophouses or a greenhouse to grow veggies in year-round. I was driving all over Dryden and Cortland, relying on the help of friends who wanted to support the farm by giving us a place to start vegetable seeds, wash and store vegetables and even a little space to grow some food. Now, after completing our 5th CSA season, the farm is starting to come into its own. There’s still a ways to go but with the support of awesome members, like you all, we can get there! 

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Week of September 3rd – CSA Newsletter

And just like that, we’ve hit September. It’s crazy how fast the farm season can go by. It seems like last week we were deciding where the season’s crops were going to be planted. September always is a crazy time on the farm because the summer crops are still cranking at a good pace but some of the fall/winter crops are ready to be harvested or will be soon. The end of the season is in sight, although it seems so far away. This time of the year is a mix of harvest/planting/cleanup projects. But this is Upstate New York, and we know that the first frost will be here before we know it. I actually had a very realistic dream (more like a nightmare) over the weekend that I woke up to a light frost and I never closed down the sides to the hoophouses. The result was that all the tomatoes and peppers growing in them had bitten the dust. It took me a few minutes but I was relieved when I realized that wasn’t the case.

The past week was a great one with all the new student interns. We spend a lot of time harvesting for their first few weeks before diving into some of the other farm tasks. I think that this is a great time of the year to expose folks to the basics of harvesting because there is so much to do. I really stress to them the importance of harvest and post-harvest handling of the vegetables that we grow. The proper harvesting techniques, times of day that we harvest certain crops, sorting and washing of crops and proper storage of vegetables. These are all extremely important so that you and all of our other customers can have the highest quality vegetables. 

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Week of August 27th – CSA Newsletter

Welcome back to all my Tompkins Cortland colleagues. I hope you all had a great first week with the hustle and bustle of students back on campus. The new semester means a new “crop” of student interns on the farm. And if the first couple of classes are any indication, it looks like a terrific group that will be spending time with me on the farm. Most of the interns this semester are new students enrolled in the Sustainable Farming and Food Systems degree at the college but we always seem to attract students from other degree programs. This semester there are a few students from the Culinary Arts program. I’m always excited when there are students who care enough about where their food comes from and want to learn some aspects of agriculture. I get especially jazzed when Culinary Arts students are on the farm. I think that it can have a huge impact on their experience at Tompkins Cortland when they can have the hands on experience that ties in the production side of things with the food that ends up in the kitchen and eventually on our plates. I believe this is the fifth semester in a row that I have had at least one student from the Culinary Arts program. 

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