Culinary Students Improving the Food System Talk

“What’s Left on the Cutting Board: Culinary Students as a Lever for Improving the Food System”

Monday April 24th at 10:30  – Sprole Conference Room at Tompkins Cortland Community College in Dryden.

Coltivare KitchenSustainability issues are at the fore in our industry but too often it is up to accomplished chefs to have an informed opinion on these matters. Learn what is being done to inculcate sustainability and health-promotion practices among our student body and sample some hands-on solutions that are hitting the market, balancing taste, nutrition and improving the food system.

Jonathan Deutsch, Ph.D., is Professor of Culinary Arts and Food Science at Drexel University. Before moving to Drexel, Deutsch built the culinary arts program at Kingsborough Community College, City University of New York (CUNY) and the Ph.D. concentration in food studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. At Drexel, he oversees the Drexel Food Lab, a student-driven product development and food innovation lab focused on solving real world problems for industry and good food projects. He is the author or editor of six books including Barbecue: A Global History (with Megan Elias), Culinary Improvisation, and Gastropolis: Food and Culture in New York City(with Annie Hauck-Lawson) and numerous articles in journals of food studies, public health and hospitality education. He earned his Ph.D. in Food Studies and Food Management from New York University (2004), his culinary degree from the Culinary Institute of America  (AOS, Culinary Arts, 1997), and is an alumnus of Drexel University (BS, Hospitality Management, 1999). A classically trained chef, Deutsch worked in a variety of settings including product development, small luxury inns and restaurants. When not in the kitchen, he can be found behind his tuba.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Poison Ivy and Weed Identification

Poison Ivy and Weed Identification – Student Post by Indigo

poison ivy weed identificationNothing seems quite as serene as taking a stroll down the back roads of Upstate New York, especially to a local like myself. The Summer is in full swing – the sun seems brighter, birds and insects sing their promiscuous songs, and the foliage resembles a lush sea of green. This is about as peaceful as life gets out here on the Lansing-Groton town line. I took a walk down the street the other day to find specimens for our plant-identification assignment, as the roadside bordering the woods is cluttered with weeds of various kinds. There are so many species; one tends to get lost in the mix of it all. After a few minutes of rummaging, I find some flowering ones, then pick them to be pressed and identified back at home. I notice and recognize a few varieties in the ditch I’m in, but little did I know I had missed one of particular importance. I’d once gotten Poison Ivy years ago in my childhood – you think I would’ve learned from the first experience. Apparently not.

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Getting Started Raising Chickens

Getting Started Raising Chickens – Student Post by Kevin

Chickens are becoming more expensive to keep with higher grain and building material costs, but still pay off in terms of  benefits to the land and adjoining systems of vegetable production or human food waste disposal. This is to say that chickens fill many niches in at least these two steps in the food supply chain, and with city ordinances in many places being modified to permit small flocks, even city dwellers can find a chicken situation to fits their needs. While these ordinances might limit flock size to a half dozen, prohibit roosters, and outlaw home slaughter, there is still room within them for production at a scale that far surpasses the needs of an individual family. Joel Salatin, a well known farmer and founder of Polyface Farm has said that chickens are even great role models for our kids – they get up early and always stay busy.

getting started raising chickens
A Frame Chicken Coop and Chicken Run 

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Composting and Strawberries at the Farm

Composting, Growing Strawberries, and Potting On Tomatoes – This Week at the TC3 Farm – Student Post By Candice

TC3 Farm Compost
TC3 Farm Compost Pile

This week at the TC3 farm we learned about composting. Composting is a natural process of recycling organic material such as leaves and vegetable scraps into rich soil humus. There are many benefits of composting food and other matter. Compost energizes the soil food web, which is made up of microscopic bacteria and fungi, along with earthworms, crickets and many other life forms. Compost enhances the ability of tomatoes and other vegetables to stand up to diseases and may improve their flavor and nutrition. Compost also helps the soil retain as much moisture as possible. You can get compost from a number of different commercial suppliers, but the best compost is homemade! The TC3 farm gets the raw material for making compost from the leftover food served at Coltivare Restaurant, in Ithaca, NY.

Uncovering Strawberries
Uncovering Strawberries

We also uncovered the strawberry patch which was under several layers of row cover for the winter, in order to let the sun get to them to enhance their nutrients. Although rained hard we were still able to get the whole patch weeded, mulched with wood chips, and we even replanted some of the plants we grew from runners in the greenhouse over the winter. Strawberry plants are known to have runners – which are stolons that the plants use to vegetatively propagate themselves. Most students offered to take the runners home and replant them last fall, while the rest were planted in the greenhouse to fill in gaps in the strawberry patch at the farm. Clipping the runners from the mother plant allows the mother plant to focus on fruit production rather than multiplying. The runners are doing great, they have blossomed and are now ready for this year’s season!

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Sustainable Growers Trip to Cornell Botanical Garden

TC3 Sustainable Growers Gardening Club – Cornell Plantations Botanical Field Trip – Student Post by Indigo

Cornell Botanical Gardens
Cornell Botanical Gardens Welcome Center

A monk by the name of St. Bernard of Clairvaux once claimed, “You will find more in the woods than in books. Trees and stones will teach you that which you can never learn from masters.”. I couldn’t agree more with this, the idea of nature providing more wisdom and knowledge than any human ever could. If focused in the present and observe what is, one can find an unparalleled education that is objective in the most extreme, provided by mother nature herself. That is exactly why the TC3 Sustainable Growers Gardening Club decided to take a Friday afternoon to go on a private tour at the Cornell Plantations Botanical Garden by Cornell’s Adult Educator & Volunteer Coordinator Kevin Moss.

On April 15th, we all meet up at the Botanical Gardens mid-afternoon. We really lucked out on the weather, while it was rather cold and grey all week, our tour day is nothing but clear blue skies and sunshine! Although it is fair weather, most plants have yet to bloom and pop with colors, but no matter – there is still plenty to be observed.  We meet Kevin in front of the parking lot sidewalk, where a map of the gardens stands. Once acquainted, he begins to tell us about the intentional design of the U-sloped ditch in front of the lot. Various shrubs and plants just short of budding are arranged along the inside of the ditch, which he explains is carefully designed to drain rainwater on a slowly on an angle, in order to prevent erosion and the loss of soil nutrients. Even the parking lot was designed in coordination, so the water can drain from there mindfully as well.

Cornell Botanical Herb Garden
Cornell Plantations Herb Garden

Read more

Please follow and like us:

Healthy Food for All Fundraiser at Coltivare

Coltivare LogoColtivare Restaurant in downtown Ithaca will be donating 15% of their Food and Beverage Sales from dinner service on Sunday, April 24, 2016 to Healthy Food for All.  Please come and support them and the cause! Food specials for that evening are listed below.  They will also will be serving their full dinner menu.  We hope to see you this weekend! Coltivare is the TC3 Farm’s partner in the College’s Farm to Bistro initiative.

Healthy Food For All (HFFA) is a non-profit program of Cornell Cooperative Extension Tompkins County in partnership with local farms.  Since 2006 they’ve been making fresh, quality produce accessible to low-income families through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares and educational resources.

Specials for Dinner on Sunday, April 24, 2016 

Taste

Local Vegetable Tofu Tagine (Moroccan Style Vegetables) with Greek Yogurt

$8 

Mains

Bostrum Farms Pork Porterhouse, Local Peaches and Bourbon, Roasted NY Fingerling Potatoes, Grilled Asparagus

$25

Mariah Farms Elk Burger, Local Carmelized Onions, Lively Run Blue Yonder Cheese, Apple Wood Bacon

$19

Read more

Please follow and like us: